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  • Updated

Southeast Missouri has seen some stretches of wet weather, as well as some hot summer days, but overall the fertile soil and widespread use of irrigation are working toward another good crop.

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The derecho that hit a wide swath of Iowa missed Mark Mueller’s farm near Waverly last year, but a late August wind storm this year took a toll.

Hurricane Ida caused a drop in grain prices over the past week as grain facilities saw shutdowns and transportation was impacted. As the affected areas get back online, don’t expect the prices to rise as fast.

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Last year was an unusual year for grain prices, as they went into a rare counter-seasonal rally that has, for the most part, held up since then. This year, the question is whether the pattern will revert to a normal seasonal one or whether it will be more like last year.

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Since early August, Iowa farmers have been reporting soybean fields or parts of fields with yellow or greenish-yellow leaves in the upper canopy which resemble early senescence and sometimes nitrogen deficiency symptoms. The soybean growth stage is mainly R4 to R5.

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Crop insurance serves as a disincentive for farmers to adopt climate-change mitigation measures, according to a new study by researchers at North Carolina State University. If insurance will compensate for crop losses due to drought or severe weather, a farmer may not want to pay extra for climate-change adaptation efforts, said Rod Rejesus, a professor of agricultural and resource economics at North Carolina State and the study’s corresponding author.

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The year started out with soils on the dry end of the spectrum over most of Missouri, suggesting easy planting and low potential for N loss. But, as often happens, it turned into a wet spring, starting in southern Missouri in April and spreading northward and westward through May and June.